Published: Fri, May 12, 2017
U.S. | By Eddie Scott

Another Confederate monument being removed in New Orleans

Another Confederate monument being removed in New Orleans

People who were there in support of the monuments coming down were moved behind one set of barricades, while the crowd of protesters who support leaving the Confederate monuments in place was moved behind another set of barricades.

The paper reports that parents of students at a school located near the statue received a robocall about the removal, citing New Orleans Police Department as the source of the information.

Rumors have surfaced several times over the past week and a half that the Davis monument was about to be taken down. City officials have been secretive about removal plans due to threats of violence against those tasked with taking down the structures.

On one side of the debate: Those who want the Confederate monuments taken down, saying they are symbols of racism and white supremacy.

People who want to see the monuments removed also gathered at the site and cheered at the sight of heavy trucks and a crane moving into place.

Dozens of protesters both supporting the monuments and calling for their removal stayed up overnight to watch the proceedings which happened in early-morning darkness. The obelisk was a tribute to whites who battled a biracial Reconstruction government installed in New Orleans after the Civil War.

About 50 protesters, some waving Confederate flags, stood directly across Jefferson Davis Parkway from the monument.

Barricades set up by NOPD in advance of the removal seemed created to act as corrals that protesters could be directed into and which would allow a line of barriers and police to remain between the two groups.

"These monuments have stood not as historic or educational markers of our legacy of slavery and segregation, but in celebration of it". Richard Marksbury, a New Orleans resident and monument supporter, said he may go to an appeal court to block removal. To literally put the Confederacy on a pedestal in some of our most prominent public places is not only an inaccurate reflection of our past, it is an affront to our present, and a bad prescription for our future.

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