Published: Sun, June 18, 2017
Hi-Tech | By Ellis Neal

Britain shifts focus to growth as it girds for Brexit talks

Britain shifts focus to growth as it girds for Brexit talks

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Wednesday the European Union was ready to start negotiating with Britain about its exit from the EU on June 19, as planned, saying she assumed that the talks would proceed despite last week's parliamentary election in Britain.

Arriving to a meeting with his counterparts in the 28-country EU, Hammond said his "clear view" is "we should prioritize protecting jobs, protecting economic growth and protecting prosperity as we enter those negotiations and take them forward".

When asked if she was in floods of tears on Friday, Davis told ITV's "Good Morning Britain" show: "Not when I saw her". The talks are taking place three months after Prime Minister Theresa May formally triggered the two-year Brexit timetable.

HSBC, which has 43,000 employees in Britain, said in January that it was planning to move "activities covered specifically by European financial regulation" to the EU, which would shift about 1,000 jobs out of the UK.

Such is the collapse of May's authority that her entire Brexit strategy is being picked apart in public by her ministers, her lawmakers and her allies on the eve of formal negotiations which begin in Brussels on Monday at 0900 GMT.

May has clung on to power since the election but has so far failed to strike an agreement with Northern Ireland's ultra-conservative Democratic Unionist Party that would allow her to govern.

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May's government has bowed to European Union demands to focus the initial stage of Brexit talks on settling the divorce rather than trying to arrange a future trade relationship at the same time, according to two EU officials with knowledge of the preparations.

The government is still in talks with a small Northern Irish party to secure the support of its 10 members of parliament to pass legislation.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron called for a cross-party committee to be set up to handle the Brexit negotiations.

The government's current weakness has helped fuel criticism of its approach to Brexit, although pro-EU campaigners' hopes that it could rethink the decision to leave the European Union have come to nothing.

"We're still in uncharted waters today and we don't know exactly how it's going to look, so we've got to plan ahead".

European Commission First President Frans Timmermans told the Prague event that the EU would be happy to see the United Kingdom change its mind and stay in the bloc.

"In my experience recently, businesses that look over the garden fence have gone: "Hmm, (the) grass is not quite as dark and unforgiving as you might expect", Andrew told the BBC.

Like this: