Published: Tue, June 20, 2017
Culture | By Stewart Greene

London mayor admits public anger over deadly fire

London mayor admits public anger over deadly fire

"In recent months, the country has witnessed a succession of bad tragedies", she said.

Fire had ripped through the 24-storey residential block in north Kensington in the early hours of June 13, trapping hundreds of people inside. Before that, Britons had been hit with three terrorist attacks in less than three months, in London and Manchester. Government and ministers will cooperate fully.

"Wallowing in the wash of a general election that stripped our prime minister of her authority on the very eve of European Union negotiations, neither common sense nor the evidence suggest she can re-establish public confidence", Matthew Parris wrote.

When May went out to meet with them at St.

Nisha Parti, a film producer who has been organising help for victims, said volunteers have been unable to access the money, and said "no one is telling us where it is".

An additional £1.5 million will be provided to pay for mental health support to the emergency services, through mental health charity Mind's Blue Light Programme.

Aluminum cladding with insulation sandwiched between two panels has been blamed for helping to spread flames in major fires in many parts of the world, including blazes in the Middle East, Europe, Asia and the United States.

Opposition politicians also say the government ignored recommendations from a 2013 review after another London fire killed six people.

"The very bad reality is, as I've said before, is that due to the intensity of the fire and the devastation within Grenfell Tower that we may not be able to identify everybody that died", he said.

"I believe there may be people who were in Grenfell Tower that people may not know were missing and may not have realized they were in there on the night".

The 23-year-old Alhajali is the only victim of the Grenfell Tower fire to be officially named as the hard process of identifying human remains continues.

In an interview with the BBC, May promised a public inquiry into the disaster and pledged that survivors would be rehoused within weeks.

The residents group said while it welcomed the funding it had not been consulted before the announcement was made.

Neither side immediately released details.

The Prime Minister insisted the Government was doing everything possible to help those caught up in the tragedy.

Public anger is mounting as residents and neighbors demand answers for how the blaze early Wednesday spread so quickly and trapped so numerous tower's 600-odd residents.

Cundy said police will investigate the tower's refurbishment project, which experts believe may have left the building more vulnerable to a catastrophic blaze.

"The response of the emergency services, NHS and the community has been heroic". More than $3.8 million has been raised for the victims.

Numerous displaced are living in churches and community centers.

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