Published: Mon, August 21, 2017
World | By Paul Elliott

Harvey falls apart, may come back, while two other Atlantic disturbances are tracked

Harvey falls apart, may come back, while two other Atlantic disturbances are tracked

What was Tropical Storm Harvey is now just being called "the remnants", which still won't cause issues for Central Florida.

The first, now a couple hundred miles north of Puerto Rico, is given a 10 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone in the next two days. It is expected to track across the central and western Caribbean Sea and will most likely make landfall somewhere along the Belize or Yucatan Peninsula coast Tuesday morning.

Two other disturbances in the Atlantic have seen their chances of developing into tropical cyclones continue to erode since yesterday. It was moving west-northwest at about 10 miles per hour (17 kph) over the open sea, and was forecast to make a gradual turn to a northward track during the next two days.

Conditions could become slightly more conducive for development once the system is near the northern Bahamas or Florida around the middle of next week.

"Monday is the only day this week with decent weather for seeing the eclipse", said forecaster Robert Molleda at the National Weather Service, pointing to the unusually low 20 percent chance of rain.

In addition, a large area of cloudiness and disorganized thunderstorms located about 900 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands is associated with a trough of low pressure.

Decent rain chances (40-50%) look to linger through next weekend as there will be plenty of tropical moisture in the Gulf of Mexico helping to fuel daily afternoon showers and storms.

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