Published: Wed, August 23, 2017
Culture | By Stewart Greene

4-year-old's long locks gets him kicked out of Texas school

4-year-old's long locks gets him kicked out of Texas school

Jessica Oates is trying to figure out what to do next after her 4-year-old son, Jabez, was told he can't return to Pre-K until he cuts his long-hair short.

Oates said she won't cut her son's hair "because that's who he is".

According to the outlet, Barbers Hill school has a strict dress code, which includes stipulations about hair length.

The school policy states that boys' hair must be above the eyes and ears and neck.

"I just want my child to get an education", she continued.

Due to the hair policy of the school, Jessica Oates tried a bun on his son's hair but it was not a good idea. "It's part of my child".

She also took to Facebook to garner support.

'Barbers Hill Texas School Districts discriminatory hair policy is an attempt to force everyone into mediocre stereotypes. "And I'm not understanding how long hair would exclude my child from an education in this school district". "However, consequences for dress code violations will be enforced". Officials told her that her son would need an official letter citing a religious or cultural exemption in order to keep his hair long and attend the school. They like cutting hair.

However, this wasn't enough - the principal called Oates saying that Jabez must cut his hair or else he wouldn't be allowed back.

The district said, "Our local elected board has established policy based on community expectations, and Barbers Hill administration will continue to implement the said policy". Whether it's punishing girls for wearing shirts that show off their shoulders or micromanaging the length of little boys' hair, it's obvious that many dress code rules are way more distracting than the actual infractions. "He doesn't understand why he is not allowed in school over something so trivial", Oates told InsideEdition.com.

"This is gender discrimination and sexist", she told reporters of the policy.

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