Published: Wed, November 15, 2017
World | By Paul Elliott

'Cards Against Humanity' buys land to try to stop border wall

'Cards Against Humanity' buys land to try to stop border wall

A foul-mouthed card game has joined Democrats, environmentalists and immigrant advocates in fighting Donald Trump's proposed border wall. "He is so afraid that he wants to build a $20 billion wall that everyone knows will accomplish nothing".

The company's goal is to "make it as time-consuming and expensive as possible for [President Trump's border wall] to get built". It's these views that have led Cards Against Humanity to purchase a chunk of territory along the US-Mexico border in an attempt to, if not foil President Donald Trump's border wall plan entirely, at least become a major pain in his ass.

The company behind Cards Against Humanity, the self-described "party game for disgusting people", has purchased a plot of land on the US-Mexico border.

The land purchase and the new website are actually part of the kickoff to the company's annual holiday season marketing stunt.

The statement goes on to detail just what exactly those "America-saving surprises" mentioned earlier are', just in case you were wondering.

For $15, customers can sign up at Cards Against Humanity Saves America, and will receive six "America-saving surprises" in the mail.

Cards Against Humanity has done holiday promotions in the past including "Cards Against Humanity's Eight Sensible Gifts for Hanukkah" and "Cards Against Humanity's Ten Days or Whatever of Kwanzaa".

"If you voted for Trump", a website launched by Cards Against Humanity said, "you might want to sit this one out". "You might not get it for a while, but some time next year you'll chuckle quietly to yourself and remember all this business about the hole", the company wrote.

The minds behind the racy card game known for their unorthodox holiday promotions have returned with yet another odd proposal.

Cards Against Humanity has historically released topical marketing campaigns, including over the summer when it marketed a pink version of the game to women that retailed for $5 more than the original game.

"We're just being regular correct", the company said.

Like this: