Published: Wed, November 22, 2017
Culture | By Stewart Greene

CBS co-hosts on Charlie Rose: not the man I know

CBS co-hosts on Charlie Rose: not the man I know

Following a damning Washington Post report on Monday detailing sexual harassment from eight women, Rose was sacked by CBS on Tuesday morning.

Ms King said she was still processing the "horrible" accusations.

"We need to take account of how much sexual violence, the barriers to reporting it, the reality of retaliation, and the lack of accountability negatively impacts women's economic lives", said Wellesley College professor Leigh Gilmore.

He then praised King and the rest of the "CBS This Morning" team for covering the allegations against Rose "as news". "Charlie and I worked together, been friends, but when you think about the anguish of those women despite the friendship you still have to report the news".

"I am greatly embarrassed".

Separately, CBS announced that Rose is suspended from his role as CBS This Morning co-host.

Bloomberg TV, which also carried "Charlie Rose" and provided the studio for it, announced that it had terminated its rebroadcast agreement soon after the PBS announcement. "I have behaved insensitively at times, and I accept responsibility for that, though I do not believe that all of these allegations are accurate".

Three new accusers, women who work at CBS News, came forward on Tuesday, the network reported.

The co-anchor of CBS This Morning told Colbert during an interview on his CBS late show on Tuesday'I was wincing at your monologue though Stephen
The co-anchor of CBS This Morning told Colbert during an interview on his CBS late show on Tuesday'I was wincing at your monologue though Stephen

"In light of yesterday's revelations, PBS has terminated its relationship with Charlie Rose and canceled distribution of his programs", PBS said in a statement on Tuesday. "PBS expects all the producers we work with to provide a workplace where people feel safe and are treated with dignity and respect".

Kyle Godfrey-Ryan told The Washington Post that her then-boss walked around naked in front of her on numerous occasions while she worked in his home in New York City, and he would often call her late at night and describe a sexual fantasy of her swimming naked in a pool, while he watched.

Citing the anchors' comments on "This Morning" earlier in the day, Colbert said that O'Donnell seemed angry.

"Especially in the news business, where it's our job to ferret out the truth and hold powerful people accountable, executives realize that they must investigate reports about their own employees swiftly, and that means promptly suspending alleged perpetrators when there are credible allegations", said Indira Lakshmanan, a journalism ethics scholar at the Poynter Institute, a media think tank in St. Petersburg, Florida. "I really am still reeling", she said. "He doesn't get a pass from anyone in this room". Because how do you - what do you say when someone that you deeply care about has done something that is so terrible.

The journalist and anchor had hosted his interview-based Charlie Rose show since 1991, winning a number of awards for his work and becoming one of the most recognisable interviewers on USA television.

An acute listener, Rose employed an engaging yet serious style in contrast to the bitter partisan arguments, cross-talk and raised voices on cable television.

CBS has yet to reveal Rose's replacement for its morning show.

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