Published: Wed, February 14, 2018
Business | By Max Garcia

Huawei rejects U.S. consumer 'security threat ' claim from Central Intelligence Agency and Federal Bureau of Investigation

Huawei rejects U.S. consumer 'security threat ' claim from Central Intelligence Agency and Federal Bureau of Investigation

"That provides the capacity to exert pressure or control over our telecommunications infrastructure". "It provides the capacity to maliciously modify or steal information". The intelligence chiefs don't recommend public servants and the staff of state agencies to use these two companies' goods and services at all.

A statement from the agencies leaders specifically called out Huawei and ZTE for posing a security risk for both USA public servants and state agencies. "And it provides the capacity to conduct undetected espionage", Wray said.

Six top US intelligence chiefs told the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday they would not advise Americans to use products or services from Chinese smartphone maker Huawei.

That line of thinking though, which is shared seemingly by the entire USA intelligence community, has held Huawei-the second-largest smartphone manufacturer in the world behind Samsung-back from realizing true success in the lucrative US smartphone market through traditional means.

While the compelling advisement came from nearly all of the highest national security and intelligence figures, it's not the first time a US official has spoken out.

Despite these setbacks, Huawei is still selling an unlocked version of its flagship Mate 10 Pro in the US.

But Huawei was treading in the wilderness, as 90 percent of the phones sold in the U.S. are backed by carriers.

"Huawei is aware of a range of US government activities seemingly aimed at inhibiting Huawei's business in the USA market".

The six intelligence bosses were speaking at the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday, when they said they would not advise Americans to use products or services from Chinese smartphone maker Huawei and fellow Chinese telecom company ZTE.

Huawei, for its part, tells CNBC that it "poses no greater cybersecurity risk than any ICT vendor".

US lawmakers were already pushing a bill that would ban the government from using Huawei and ZTE phones, citing connections between these companies and the Chinese government, but this is the first time that everyday consumers are being warned. "You need to look long and hard at companies like this".

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