Published: Tue, March 13, 2018
World | By Paul Elliott

More P&W Engine Problems As India Grounds 11 A320neos

More P&W Engine Problems As India Grounds 11 A320neos

The moves comes hours after of engine failure was reported on an A-320 Neo when an IndiGo aircraft took off from Ahmedabad for Lucknow on Monday.

As per the directive, EASA has imposed restrictions "on grounding of aeroplanes having two affected engines within three flight cycles", the agency said in statement on Monday.

According to the source, an aircraft on average operates seven to eight trips a day and considering that 11 aircraft have been grounded, the number of cancelled flights could easily touch around 80-90 besides the cascading delays. The aircraft landed safely on one engine with no injuries. That's not acceptable, according to the Indian regulator, which said the manufacturer had "no concrete proposal in place at this stage".

The DGCA has also ordered the airlines not to refit the engines even though there are spares in their inventories. The corrective action has been approved and we have already begun to deliver production engines with the upgraded configuration.

"We are working closely with our customers to minimize disruption".

Under the Pratt plan, all defective components would be replaced by early June, requiring some planes to fly with one affected engine for nearly three more months. "In view of the above, and keeping in mind the safety of aircraft operations, A320neos fitted with PW1100 engines beyond engine serial number 450 have been grounded with immediate effect". These were: GoAir A-320 Neo (VT-WGB) after take-off from Leh on February 24; IndiGo A-320 Neo (VT-ITJ) after take-off from Mumbai on March 5 and IndiGo A-320 Neo (VT-ITA) after take-off from Ahmedabad on March 12.

India unilaterally grounded all Airbus SE narrow-body planes powered by the latest Pratt & Whitney engines after a series of in-flight incidents prompted the local regulator to question the safety of the aircraft.

On 13 February, DGCA had said that it was monitoring engine glitches to ensure that safety is not compromised at any time.

In February, the United States aviation regulator said the Pratt & Whitney engines pose a shutdown risk, following similar action by European regulators that month.

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